The Difference Between “Remote” and “Remote-First” — ReadThink (by HubSpot)

Remote-First: a company culture that hires without regard to location, with a culture of productivity to match

 

Thoughts on building a remote culture, from a remote CEO.

Paul Farnell, CEO of Litmus writes:

One misconception about remote work is that it hinders collaboration. In my experience, the inverse is more likely: offices hinder independent work. Collaboration tends to happen in short bursts, followed by longer periods of writing, designing, coding and thinking. It’s more important to give employees quiet time than it is to cram them into an open office.

Litmus is a remote company with a collective 15,000 square feet of office space. That might sound crazy, but I believe offices afford some benefits that distributed work simply can’t replace.

We’ve had a remote-first mindset since the beginning, but we’ve also always had some kind of office space for meetings, collaboration and socializing. First it was a little corner of coworking space, then a small office and eventually a full-fledged HQ.

Read at Medium

Using Feature Queries in CSS

How to use @supports in CSS to specify CSS that targets browsers capable of implementing a certain feature

 

So when do you want to use @supports? A Feature Query is a tool for bundling together CSS declarations so that they’ll run as a group under certain conditions. Use a Feature Query when you want to apply a mix of old and new CSS, but only when the new CSS is supported.

Let’s look at an example using the Initial Letter property. This new property initial-letter tells the browser to make the element in question bigger — like for a drop cap. Here, the first letter of the first word in a paragraph is being told to be the size of four lines of text. Fabulous. Oh, but I would also like to make that letter bold, and put a bit of margin on its right side, and hey, let’s make it a nice orange color. Cool.

We don’t want to change the color of the letter, or add a margin, or make it bold unless it’s also going to be made bigger by the Initial Letter property. We need a way to test and see whether or not the browser understands initial-letter, and only apply the change to color, weight, and margin if it does. Enter the Feature Query.

Read more from the source: hacks.mozilla.org

Writing Less Damn Code

The better you understand the newest HTML and CSS, you’ll find that much of the code we write can be eliminated altogether

 

But it turns out the only surefire way to make performant Web Stuff is also to just write less. Minify? Okay. Compress? Well, yeah. Cache? Sounds technical. Flat out refuse to code something or include someone else’s code in the first place? Now you’re talking.

Read more from heydonworks.com

The target=”_blank” phishing attack vector

If you use target=”_blank” you need to also use rel=”noopener noreferrer”

 

Ben Halpern writes:

If you use the target=”_blank” attribute on a link, and do not accompany it with a rel=”noopener” attribute, you are leaving your users open to a very simple phishing attack.

When a website uses target=”_blank” on their links in order to open a new tab or window, that website gives the new page access to the existing window through the window.opener API, allowing it a few permissions. Some of these permissions are automatically negated by cross-domain restrictions, but window.location is fair game.

In order to restrict the behavior window.opener access, the original page needs to add a rel=”noopener” attribute to any link that has target=”_blank”. However, Firefox does not support that tag, so you should actually use rel=”noopener noreferrer” for full coverage. Some amount of prevention can be acheived through scripting, though, as observed with Twitter, this seems to fail on Safari.

Read more from The Practical Developer

The Search For The Holy Grail: How I Ended Up With Element Queries, And How You Can Use Them Today – Smashing Magazine

EQCSS, an experiment in extending CSS with Element Queries, a way to apply styles based on element-specific conditions

 

For some time, we’ve run up against the limits of what CSS can do. Those who build responsive layouts will freely admit the frustrations and shortcomings of CSS that force us to reach for CSS preprocessors, plugins and other tools to help us write the styles that we’re unable to write with CSS alone. Even still, we run into limitations with what current tools help us accomplish. Think for a moment of a physical structure. If you’re building a large edifice with weak material, a lot of external support is required to hold it together, and things have to be overbuilt to stay sturdy. When you’re building a website out of HTML, CSS and JavaScript, this external support might look like frameworks, plugins, preprocessors, transpilers, editing tools, package managers and build processes.

Read more from the source: Smashing Magazine