Previewing ES6 Modules and more from ES2015, ES2016 and beyond

MS Edge adds ES6 features including import and export

 

Most of ES2015 (aka ES6) language support is already available in Edge, and last week’s Windows Insider Preview build 14342 brings more ES6 capabilities including modules, default parameters, and destructuring. We’re not stopping there – Edge also supports all ES2016 (aka ES7) proposals – the exponentiation operator and Array.prototype.includes – as well as future ECMAScript proposals such as Async Functions and utility methods like Object.values/entries and String.prototype.padStart/padEnd.

Read more from the source: Microsoft Edge Dev Blog

Node.js ES6 Support

Come on TC39, V8 and Node have implemented all but the most obscure parts of ES6–where is the standard for import?

 

NodeJS 6.1 passes 96% of ES6 tests, failing only on proper tail calls, iterator closing, and some Proxying of internal `get` calls.

But no standard is in sight for resolving resources based on the string in import statements.

View the compatibility table results at node.green

WebKit stops prefixing

WebKit ends its use of prefixes following Microsoft’s decision to make Edge support WebKit prefixes

 

WebKit’s new feature policy is to implement experimental features unprefixed, behind a runtime flag.

We’ll be evaluating existing features on a case-by-case basis. We expect to significantly reduce the number of prefixed properties supported over time but Web compatibility will require us to keep around prefixed versions of some features.

Read the announcement at WebKit

10 Stats That’ll Change the Way You Think About Remote Work – Jell Blog

Contrary to Yahoo’s recent move to ban remote work, research shows companies who commit to telecommuting foster happier employees and more efficient teams

 

We’re still not sure why Yahoo’s CEO recently decided to ban the practice, but we can tell you this:

Companies committed to remote work share two common traits:

  1. Happy employees
  2. Efficient teams

Those aren’t claims based on anecdotal evidence. Numerous scientifically-rigorous, survey-backed empirical findings show how companies offering the flexibility to work from home (or coffee shops or co-working spaces) tend to be more profitable and productive than businesses that support on-site work only.

Read at Jell Blog

CSS Scroll Snap Points Module Level 1

Get more control of the scroll bar with the proposed CSS scroll snap points feature

 

Popular UX paradigms for scrollable content frequently employ paging through content, or sectioning into logical divisions. This is especially true for touch interactions where it is quicker and easier for users to quickly pan through a flatly-arranged breadth of content rather than delving into a heirarchical structure through tap navigation. For example, it is easier for a user to view many photos in a photo album by panning through a photo slideshow view rather than tapping on individual photos in an album.

However, given the imprecise nature of scrolling inputs like touch panning and mousewheel scrolling, it is difficult for web developers to guarantee a well-controlled scrolling experience, in particular creating the effect of paging through content. For instance, it is easy for a user to land at an awkward scroll offset which leaves a page partially on-screen when panning.

Read the W3C proposal at: drafts.csswg.org