The New System Font Stack?

As system fonts get nicer you might consider treating them like first-class citizens on your web site


Ire Aderinokun writes:

A few months ago, I wrote about how you can use system fonts in the browser using the built-in keywords that work with the font shorthand property (see Using System Fonts in the Browser).

Relatively recently, some websites and web applications have been adopting a new method for using system fonts in the browser. With this method, the fonts used by different systems are explicitly called themselves in the font-family property.

Read more from the source: bitsofcode

Yarn: A new package manager for JavaScript

Facebook fixes several problems with npm; will yarn become the new standard, will npm make changes, or will developers not care?


We’ve used the npm client successfully at Facebook for years, but as the size of our codebase and the number of engineers grew, we ran into problems with consistency, security, and performance. After trying to solve for each issue as it came up, we set out to build a new solution to help us manage our dependencies more reliably. The product of that work is called Yarn — a fast, reliable, and secure alternative npm client.

Read more at Facebook Code

The Difference Between “Remote” and “Remote-First” — ReadThink (by HubSpot)

Remote-First: a company culture that hires without regard to location, with a culture of productivity to match


Thoughts on building a remote culture, from a remote CEO.

Paul Farnell, CEO of Litmus writes:

One misconception about remote work is that it hinders collaboration. In my experience, the inverse is more likely: offices hinder independent work. Collaboration tends to happen in short bursts, followed by longer periods of writing, designing, coding and thinking. It’s more important to give employees quiet time than it is to cram them into an open office.

Litmus is a remote company with a collective 15,000 square feet of office space. That might sound crazy, but I believe offices afford some benefits that distributed work simply can’t replace.

We’ve had a remote-first mindset since the beginning, but we’ve also always had some kind of office space for meetings, collaboration and socializing. First it was a little corner of coworking space, then a small office and eventually a full-fledged HQ.

Read at Medium

Using Feature Queries in CSS

How to use @supports in CSS to specify CSS that targets browsers capable of implementing a certain feature


So when do you want to use @supports? A Feature Query is a tool for bundling together CSS declarations so that they’ll run as a group under certain conditions. Use a Feature Query when you want to apply a mix of old and new CSS, but only when the new CSS is supported.

Let’s look at an example using the Initial Letter property. This new property initial-letter tells the browser to make the element in question bigger — like for a drop cap. Here, the first letter of the first word in a paragraph is being told to be the size of four lines of text. Fabulous. Oh, but I would also like to make that letter bold, and put a bit of margin on its right side, and hey, let’s make it a nice orange color. Cool.

We don’t want to change the color of the letter, or add a margin, or make it bold unless it’s also going to be made bigger by the Initial Letter property. We need a way to test and see whether or not the browser understands initial-letter, and only apply the change to color, weight, and margin if it does. Enter the Feature Query.

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