Sass Pixel Art

Get crazy with CSS box-shadow; here’s a walkthrough on making pixel art from a single div with a little help from Sass

 

Una Kravets begins her article:

Each pixel is it’s own, individually placed box shadow. These are strung together via a comma-separated list. You can have as many box-shadows as you want on a div. Pretty cool.

Read Una’s post at una.im

We Tested How Googlebot Crawls Javascript And Here’s What We Learned

This study announces a big win for single-page apps that are concerned with SEO

 

Think Google can’t handle JavaScript? Think again. Contributor Adam Audette shares the results of a series of tests conducted by his colleagues at Merkle | RKG to examine how different JavaScript functions would be crawled and indexed by Google.

TL;DR

1. We ran a series of tests that verified Google is able to execute and index JavaScript with a multitude of implementations. We also confirmed Google is able to render the entire page and read the DOM, thereby indexing dynamically generated content.

2. SEO signals in the DOM (page titles, meta descriptions, canonical tags, meta robots tags, etc.) are respected. Content dynamically inserted in the DOM is also crawlable and indexable. Furthermore, in certain cases, the DOM signals may even take precedence over contradictory statements in HTML source code. This will need more work, but was the case for several of our tests.

Read more from the source: Search Engine Land

Node project spinoff Io.js is moving to the Node.js Foundation, with a merge in progress

Forks work! The node codebase is stepping down; the recent fork io.js will be the new node

 

In a major step toward reconciliation with the open-source project for trendy server-side JavaScript framework Node.js, the technical committee in charge of the Io.js group, which split off from the Node project several months ago, today voted to join the Node.js Foundation.

Read more at VentureBeat

How To Safely Hash A Password

If you’re not using bcrypt get with it or be vulnerable

 

Coda Hale writes:

Use bcrypt.

Why Not {MD5, SHA1, SHA256, SHA512, SHA-3, etc}?

These are all general purpose hash functions, designed to calculate a digest of huge amounts of data in as short a time as possible. This means that they are fantastic for ensuring the integrity of data and utterly rubbish for storing passwords.

A modern server can calculate the MD5 hash of about 330MB every second. If your users have passwords which are lowercase, alphanumeric, and 6 characters long, you can try every single possible password of that size in around 40 seconds.

For PHP 5.5, use password_hash(). For PHP 5.3.7 through PHP 5.4.x use the password_compat polyfill on GitHub.

Read the full article at codahale.com

ramjet: Transform One DOM Element into Another

Check out this cool transition effect library for JavaScript

 

Ramjet makes it looks as though one DOM element is capable of transforming into another, no matter where the two elements sit in the DOM tree.

It does so by making copies of the two elements (and all their children), setting a fixed position on each, then using CSS transforms to morph the two elements in sync.

View the demo at rich-harris.co.uk