Integrating feature requests without destroying your product

Look at feature requests as a request for a new or improved workflow, not a new feature


1. Listen to client feedback with an interpretive ear, and don’t be afraid to dig deeper to identify underlying problems

2. Sometimes feature requests are actually usability issues in disguise

3. Sometimes the product features clients request are actually new product offerings in disguise

4. Focus your energy on hearing the users’ needs, not the users’ wants

5. More features do not equal a better product

Read more from the source: InVision Blog

Node.js Foundation releases Node v4.0.0 (Stable)

io.js has completed its mission: Node v4 was released this week!


The collaborators of the Node.js project and the members of the Node.js Foundation are proud to offer v4.0.0 for general release. This release represents countless hours of hard work encapsulated in both the Node.js project and the io.js project that are now combined in a single codebase. The Node.js project is now operated by a team of 44 collaborators, 15 of which form its Technical Steering Committee (TSC). Further, over 100 new individuals have been added to the list of people contributing code to core since v0.12.7.

Node.js v4.0.0 contains V8 v4.5, the same version of V8 shipping with the Chrome web browser today. This brings with it many bonuses for Node.js users, most notably a raft of new ES6 features that are enabled by default including block scoping, classes, typed arrays (Node’s Buffer is now backed by Uint8Array), generators, Promises, Symbols, template strings, collections (Map, Set, etc.) and, new to V8 v4.5, arrow functions.

Read more from the source:

Google’s look, evolved

The “G” has a new style! Today Google announced a simplified logo that emphasizes its four major colors. The new logo is already in place on Google Drive and Google Search.


Today we’re introducing a new logo and identity family that reflects this reality and shows you when the Google magic is working for you, even on the tiniest screens. As you’ll see, we’ve taken the Google logo and branding, which were originally built for a single desktop browser page, and updated them for a world of seamless computing across an endless number of devices and different kinds of inputs (such as tap, type and talk).

It doesn’t simply tell you that you’re using Google, but also shows you how Google is working for you. For example, new elements like a colorful Google mic help you identify and interact with Google whether you’re talking, tapping or typing. Meanwhile, we’re bidding adieu to the little blue “g” icon and replacing it with a four-color “G” that matches the logo.

Read more from the source: Official Google Blog