CSS Scroll Snap Points Module Level 1

Get more control of the scroll bar with the proposed CSS scroll snap points feature

 

Popular UX paradigms for scrollable content frequently employ paging through content, or sectioning into logical divisions. This is especially true for touch interactions where it is quicker and easier for users to quickly pan through a flatly-arranged breadth of content rather than delving into a heirarchical structure through tap navigation. For example, it is easier for a user to view many photos in a photo album by panning through a photo slideshow view rather than tapping on individual photos in an album.

However, given the imprecise nature of scrolling inputs like touch panning and mousewheel scrolling, it is difficult for web developers to guarantee a well-controlled scrolling experience, in particular creating the effect of paging through content. For instance, it is easy for a user to land at an awkward scroll offset which leaves a page partially on-screen when panning.

Read the W3C proposal at: drafts.csswg.org

Changes to npm’s unpublish policy

npm decides to keep their unpublish functionality but puts in place rules to prevent breaking other packages

 

npm writes on their blog:

One of Node.js’ core strengths is the community’s trust in npm’s registry. As it’s grown, the registry has filled with packages that are more and more interconnected.

A byproduct of being so interdependent is that a single actor can wreak significant havoc across the ecosystem. If a publisher unpublishes a package that others depend upon, this breaks every downstream project that depends upon it, possibly thousands of projects.

Last Tuesday’s events revealed that this danger isn’t just hypothetical, and it’s one for which we already should have been prepared. It’s our mission to help the community succeed, and by failing to protect the community, we didn’t uphold that mission.

We’re sorry.

Read the whole post

normalize.css hits 4.0

I ran into an IE 9 – 11 bug last night that would have been fixed with a css reset and now I have more respect for normalize.css

 

What does it do?

  • Preserves useful defaults, unlike many CSS resets.
  • Normalizes styles for a wide range of elements.
  • Corrects bugs and common browser inconsistencies.
  • Improves usability with subtle modifications.
  • Explains what code does using detailed comments.

Read more and download on GitHub

Styling Broken Images

Use :before and :after pseudo-elements with an attr() expression to make broken images look snazzy

 

Broken images are ugly. But they don’t always have to be. We can use CSS to apply styles to the element to provide a better experience than the default. Two Facts About The Element To understand how we can style broken images, there

Read how at bitsofcode