V8 JavaScript Engine: V8 Release 4.9

Chrome 49 boasts 91% ES6 support

 

In V8 release 4.9 we shipped more JavaScript ES2015 features than in any other previous release, bringing us to 91% completion as measured by the Kangax compatibility table (as of January 26). V8 now supports destructuring, default parameters, Proxy objects, and the Reflect API.

Release 4.9 also makes block level constructs such as class and let available outside of strict mode and adds support for the sticky flag on regular expressions and customizable Object.prototype.toString output.

Read more from the source: v8project.blogspot.com

Looking ahead: Microsoft Edge for developers in 2016

MS Edge priorities for 2016: better extension API, performance, more ES6 support, WOFF2, Web Notifications and more

 

We’ve been immersing ourselves in your feedback, reviewing development trends, and meeting with partners and developers around the globe to inform where we take EdgeHTML next. We want to ensure we’re focusing on the most impactful work! In the spirit of continuing our opennness, we’d like to share our priorities for 2016.

Read more from the source: Microsoft Edge Dev Blog

Why I Left Gulp and Grunt for npm Scripts

Gulp and Grunt leave you dependent on plugin authors, stick you with debugging, and provide disjointed documentation. Why not just use JavaScript?

Cory House writes:

I know what you’re thinking. WAT?! Didn’t Gulp just kill Grunt? Why can’t we just be content for a few minutes here in JavaScript land? I hear ya, but…

I’ve found Gulp and Grunt to be unnecessary abstractions. npm scripts are plenty powerful and often easier to live with.

Read more from the source: Medium

Tasks, microtasks, queues and schedules

JavaScript Promises and Mutation Observers schedule work as microtasks which fire after the script finishes but before the next event loop. Not all browsers get it right.

 

Jake Archibald writes:

When I told my colleague Matt Gaunt I was thinking of writing a piece on microtask queueing and execution within the browser’s event loop, he said “I’ll be honest with you Jake, I’m not going to read that”. Well, I’ve written it anyway, so we’re all going to sit here and enjoy it, ok?

Read the blog article at jakearchibald.com

ChakraCore GitHub repository is now open

Microsoft makes Chakra open source and pits it against V8, providing a drop-in alternative to V8 with Node.js. Only on Windows so far.

 

In a December 2015 talk at JSConf US, we announced that we would be open-sourcing the key components of the Chakra JavaScript engine that powers Microsoft Edge. Today, we are excited to share with you that we’ve just made the sources for ChakraCore available under the MIT License at the ChakraCore GitHub repository. Going forward, we’ll be developing the key components of Chakra in the open.

Read more from the source: Microsoft Edge Dev Blog