Category Archives: JavaScript

Webpack 3: Official Release

Just when we moved fully to Webpack 2, Webpack 3 comes out with scope hoisting and magic comments

 

After we released webpack v2, we made some promises to the community. We promised that we would deliver the features you voted for. Moreover, we promised to deliver them in a faster, more stable release cycle.

No more year-long betas, no breaking changes between release candidates. We promised to do you right by you, the community that makes webpack thrive.

Read more from the source: Medium

Why I Chose React Over Vue – Steven Poulton

A look at why immutability and functional workflow are better solutions than reactive state and domain-specific language

 

React and Vue are ostensibly very similar and I have shipped projects using both. They both use a virtual DOM and they are both narrowly-focused view libraries. They are both solutions to the same problem as reactive HTML rendering tools but I believe they have a single defining difference that cascades down through your entire workflow. React fully embraces Javascript, Vue does not.

A common mantra often heard amongst React users is “it’s just Javascript” and that’s very true. Vue just seems to have a lot of unnecessary magic which makes components more difficult to reason about.

Read more at Medium

TypeScript at Slack: how we converted and what we learned

Case study of converting a large codebase from JavaScript to TypeScript: it is not as painful as you might think.

 

On the Slack Engineering Blog, Felix Rieseberg writes:

We decided to use Microsoft’s TypeScript, which combines static type analysis with a compiler. Modern JavaScript is valid TypeScript, meaning that one can use TypeScript without changing a single line of code. This allowed us to use “gradual typing” by enabling the compiler and the static analysis early, without suspending work on critical bug fixes or new features.

In practice, switching the analysis and the compiler on without changing code means that TypeScript will immediately attempt to understand your code. It uses built-in types and type definitions available for third party dependencies to analyze the code’s flow, pointing out subtle errors that went previously unnoticed. Wherever TypeScript cannot understand your code, it will assume a special type called “any” and simply move on.

Read more from the source: Several People Are Coding

CSS Animations vs the Web Animations API: A Case Study

Controlling CSS keyframes, transitions and animations from JavaScript: pretty intuitive

 

Last week, I wrote about how I created the bitsofcode logo animation with CSS. After that, it was suggested that I attempt a comparison between a CSS animation and the Web Animations API, so here it is! Introduction to the Web Animations API As with last week, I’ll start this

Read more from the source: bitsofcode

Yarn: A new package manager for JavaScript

Facebook fixes several problems with npm; will yarn become the new standard, will npm make changes, or will developers not care?

 

We’ve used the npm client successfully at Facebook for years, but as the size of our codebase and the number of engineers grew, we ran into problems with consistency, security, and performance. After trying to solve for each issue as it came up, we set out to build a new solution to help us manage our dependencies more reliably. The product of that work is called Yarn — a fast, reliable, and secure alternative npm client.

Read more at Facebook Code