Category Archives: Technology

Replacing the Jet Engine While Still Flying

Firefox is taking a one-piece-at-a-time strategy to replace the Gecko rendering engine with a modern one coded in Rust.

 

Mozilla’s been working on a brand new, top-secret engine. Except it’s totally not top-secret. Never was. At another company it would have been a top-secret project. At Mozilla, it’s all done out in the open.

The project is called Servo. It was started as an experiment. It’s coded in a new programming language called Rust. (Gecko is written in C++.) And it’s open source. You can totally help us make it.

Read more from the source: jensimmons.com

WebKit stops prefixing

WebKit ends its use of prefixes following Microsoft’s decision to make Edge support WebKit prefixes

 

WebKit’s new feature policy is to implement experimental features unprefixed, behind a runtime flag.

We’ll be evaluating existing features on a case-by-case basis. We expect to significantly reduce the number of prefixed properties supported over time but Web compatibility will require us to keep around prefixed versions of some features.

Read the announcement at WebKit

Google’s look, evolved

The “G” has a new style! Today Google announced a simplified logo that emphasizes its four major colors. The new logo is already in place on Google Drive and Google Search.

 

Today we’re introducing a new logo and identity family that reflects this reality and shows you when the Google magic is working for you, even on the tiniest screens. As you’ll see, we’ve taken the Google logo and branding, which were originally built for a single desktop browser page, and updated them for a world of seamless computing across an endless number of devices and different kinds of inputs (such as tap, type and talk).

It doesn’t simply tell you that you’re using Google, but also shows you how Google is working for you. For example, new elements like a colorful Google mic help you identify and interact with Google whether you’re talking, tapping or typing. Meanwhile, we’re bidding adieu to the little blue “g” icon and replacing it with a four-color “G” that matches the logo.

Read more from the source: Official Google Blog

The Hamburger Menu Doesn’t Work

With engagement down and confusion up, Facebook and others stop using hamburger menus

 

James Archer writes:

The hamburger menu is one of the more embarrassing design conventions of recent years, and it’s time to stop thinking of it as a default, unquestioned solution for mobile navigation.

Our team fell for it, too. We had reservations, of course, and talked through possible alternatives, but for about a year and a half it was the established industry convention for dealing with mobile navigation. Our clients were asking for it, everyone was talking about how great it was, and there wasn’t yet enough data to have clear answers one way or another. We launched a lot of sites that use hamburger menus. We did the best we could with what our industry knew at time.

However, the data’s in now. The hamburger menu doesn’t work well, and it’s time for everyone to move on. At this point, there aren’t many good excuses for using them in new site designs, and it very well may be worth revisiting older sites to see if they might perform better with an updated navigation structure.

Read more from the source: Deep Design

The technology behind preview photos

Facebook Developers explain how they include ~200 byte preview JPEG images in user profile JSON payload to speed up load times

 

Facebook profiles can be slow to download and display. This is especially true on low-connectivity or mobile networks, which often leave you staring at an empty gray box as you wait for images to download. This is a problem in developing markets such as India, where many people new to Facebook are primarily using 2G networks. Our engineering team took this on as a challenge: What could we design and build that would leave a much better first impression?

How a change in preview photos helped speed up profile and page loads by 30 percent.

Read more from the source: Facebook Code