Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2017

What are developers up to today?

 

Each year since 2011, Stack Overflow has asked developers about their favorite technologies, coding habits, and work preferences, as well as how they learn, share, and level up. This year represents the largest group of respondents in our history: 64,000 developers took our annual survey in January.

As the world’s largest and most trusted community of software developers, we run this survey and share these results to improve developers’ lives: We want to empower developers by providing them with rich information about themselves, their industry, and their peers. And we want to use this information to educate employers about who developers are and what they need.

We learn something new every time we run our survey.

Read more from the source: Stack Overflow

I Got Rejected by Apple Music… So I Redesigned It

A deep and insightful dive into the design of a complex app like Apple Music

 

Jason Yuan writes:

Earlier this year I applied and interviewed for a graphic design internship at Apple Music (an opportunity of a lifetime), and was turned down with a very kind letter stating that although they liked my work, they wanted to see more growth and training.

At first, I was frustrated — Northwestern University doesn’t offer any sort of undergraduate graphic design program, so whatever growth they were looking for would have to be self taught…

…but as soon as I came to this realization, I became inspired to embark on what became a a three-month long journey to the holy grail — the iOS app that Apple Music deserves.

Read more from the source: Medium

CSS Custom Properties and Theming

Update css variable values using JavaScript and update all stylesheet rules that reference that variable

 

Chris Coyier writes:

We posted not long ago about the difference between native CSS variables (custom properties) and preprocessor variables. There are a few esoteric things preprocessor variables can do that native variables cannot, but for the most part, native variables can do the same things. But, they are more powerful because of how they are live-interpolated. Should their values ever change (e.g. JavaScript, media query hits, etc) the change triggers immediate change on the site.

Cool, right? But still, how actually useful is that? What are the major use cases? I think we’re still seeing those shake out.

Read more from the source: CSS-Tricks

What Programming Languages Are Used Most on Weekends? – Stack Overflow Blog

Amazing analysis of what developers REALLY want to work on

 

For me, the weekends are mostly about spending time with my family, reading for leisure, and working on the open-source projects I am involved in. These weekend projects overlap with the work that I do in my day job here at Stack Overflow, but are not exactly the same. Many developers tinker with side projects for learning or career development (or just for fun!) and at Stack Overflow, we support all types of technologies, from professional to hobbyist. Whenever people are working, we’re available to answer their questions. But what languages tend to be asked about on weekends, as opposed to weekdays?

Read more from the source: Stack Overflow Blog

TypeScript at Slack: how we converted and what we learned

Case study of converting a large codebase from JavaScript to TypeScript: it is not as painful as you might think.

 

On the Slack Engineering Blog, Felix Rieseberg writes:

We decided to use Microsoft’s TypeScript, which combines static type analysis with a compiler. Modern JavaScript is valid TypeScript, meaning that one can use TypeScript without changing a single line of code. This allowed us to use “gradual typing” by enabling the compiler and the static analysis early, without suspending work on critical bug fixes or new features.

In practice, switching the analysis and the compiler on without changing code means that TypeScript will immediately attempt to understand your code. It uses built-in types and type definitions available for third party dependencies to analyze the code’s flow, pointing out subtle errors that went previously unnoticed. Wherever TypeScript cannot understand your code, it will assume a special type called “any” and simply move on.

Read more from the source: Several People Are Coding