Tag Archives: Graphic Design

Google’s look, evolved

The “G” has a new style! Today Google announced a simplified logo that emphasizes its four major colors. The new logo is already in place on Google Drive and Google Search.

 

Today we’re introducing a new logo and identity family that reflects this reality and shows you when the Google magic is working for you, even on the tiniest screens. As you’ll see, we’ve taken the Google logo and branding, which were originally built for a single desktop browser page, and updated them for a world of seamless computing across an endless number of devices and different kinds of inputs (such as tap, type and talk).

It doesn’t simply tell you that you’re using Google, but also shows you how Google is working for you. For example, new elements like a colorful Google mic help you identify and interact with Google whether you’re talking, tapping or typing. Meanwhile, we’re bidding adieu to the little blue “g” icon and replacing it with a four-color “G” that matches the logo.

Read more from the source: Official Google Blog

The Hamburger Menu Doesn’t Work

With engagement down and confusion up, Facebook and others stop using hamburger menus

 

James Archer writes:

The hamburger menu is one of the more embarrassing design conventions of recent years, and it’s time to stop thinking of it as a default, unquestioned solution for mobile navigation.

Our team fell for it, too. We had reservations, of course, and talked through possible alternatives, but for about a year and a half it was the established industry convention for dealing with mobile navigation. Our clients were asking for it, everyone was talking about how great it was, and there wasn’t yet enough data to have clear answers one way or another. We launched a lot of sites that use hamburger menus. We did the best we could with what our industry knew at time.

However, the data’s in now. The hamburger menu doesn’t work well, and it’s time for everyone to move on. At this point, there aren’t many good excuses for using them in new site designs, and it very well may be worth revisiting older sites to see if they might perform better with an updated navigation structure.

Read more from the source: Deep Design

Responsive email design

The lessons I’ve learned for designing emails that look good on every device

  • Campaign Monitor explains a lot of these ideas that I’ve discovered through my own email projects:
  • Outlook respects widths only for table, tr, and td elements.
  • Outlook handles padding only for td elements.
  • You can add css targeted to Outlook using this block: <!–[if mso]><style>…</style><![endif]–>
  • You can insert a <link> element to get custom Google Fonts; just be sure that you use an mso block to specify a fallback font for Outlook; otherwise it will fall back to Times New Roman.
  • You can shrink content widths and images for iPhone Mail using media queries.
  • Always use 6-character hex values for colors (not 3 characters).
  • Lotus notes and Blackberry are lost causes.
  • You’ll have to deal with a sub-optimal experience for Gmail for Android. It suffers from most of the limitations of web-based Gmail.
  • Use Litmus.com for testing emails!
  • It is complex but possible to send multi-column emails using <table align”…”>.
  • Always provide a sensible plain-text mime part; Outlook and others use this plain text to construct the first-line preview. If not, you’ll see <doctype html><head>…

Read the guide at campaignmonitor.com

Other helpful resources:

http://templates.mailchimp.com/development/css/client-specific-styles/ http://templates.mailchimp.com/development/css/reset-styles/ http://templates.mailchimp.com/development/css/outlook-conditional-css/

Introducing Noun Project for Mac

The line-drawing vector icons trend continues: the Noun Project makes finding and using icons a breeze

 

Search, drag, and drop the visual language from your desktop.

Search over 100,000 icons. The Mac App constantly updates, giving you fresh content every day.

Use with your favorite apps including Adobe Creative Cloud Apps, Sketch, PowerPoint.

Read more from the source: The Noun Project

UX is UI — Medium

User experience begins with strategy and requires layers of feature scope, site structure, site skeleton, and “surface” or the graphic interface

 

In a post adapted from a short talk Mike Atherton gave at the SODA Social meetup in London on May 14th, 2015 he writes:

In UX there’s no ‘one-size-fits-all’ design pattern for a given situation. Despite what clients ask, there’s no more a ‘best practice from a UX perspective’ than there is a ‘best recipe from a cookery perspective’.

“Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I’ll spend the first four sharpening the axe.” – Abraham Lincoln

It’s about research, understanding, and evaluation. Figuring out the right problem to solve, before dipping into our toolbag of methods and patterns to solve it.

Read the post at Medium