Tag Archives: React

Why I Chose React Over Vue – Steven Poulton

A look at why immutability and functional workflow are better solutions than reactive state and domain-specific language

 

React and Vue are ostensibly very similar and I have shipped projects using both. They both use a virtual DOM and they are both narrowly-focused view libraries. They are both solutions to the same problem as reactive HTML rendering tools but I believe they have a single defining difference that cascades down through your entire workflow. React fully embraces Javascript, Vue does not.

A common mantra often heard amongst React users is “it’s just Javascript” and that’s very true. Vue just seems to have a lot of unnecessary magic which makes components more difficult to reason about.

Read more at Medium

Introduction to WebpackBin BETA

Watch out Plunkr, WebpackBin is going to redefine code sharing in 2016

 

A video introduction to the BETA of WebpackBin, a next generation code sharing tool.

Top features include:

  1. Compiling with Webpack including loaders for ES6, Typescript and JSX
  2. Install npm packages
  3. Download your working app
  4. Boilerplates such as a working React app
  5. Live reload
  6. Real-time code sharing, editing, and passing control

Try it out at webpackbin.com

Watch the video on YouTube

React, JSX and ES6: The Weird Parts

Valid JSX complaints: overuse of element nodes and an ugly API for if statements, doctype, and comments

 

“I’ve spent a few days working with JSX and React and I have mixed feelings about them. React is pretty neat, but I find that they made some very unusual choices when it comes to their API design. Then there’s JSX, definitely the weirdest aspect of React – we’ll look into it as well. I’ve really enjoyed the ES6 and Babel experience, although I’ve noticed that there’s a learning curve where you start to decide whether using an ES6 feature is better than its ES5 equivalent or not, something we’ll explore towards the end of the article.”

Read more at Pony Foo

Removing User Interface Complexity, or Why React is Awesome

Write a native mobile app using React. It’s fast because React’s view-diffing magic lets you skip the compile step.

 

James Long gives an in-depth look at his first impressions using React Native, a framework for writing iOS and Android apps in React.

He says:

Facebook gave all attendees of React Conf early access to the source code of React Native, a new way to write native mobile apps. The technology takes everything that’s great about React.js and applies it to native apps. You write JavaScript components using a set of builtin primitives that are backed by actual native iOS or Android components.

We’ve all heard the promise of cross-platform native apps driven by JavaScript. Titanium, PhoneGap, and other projects allow various levels of hooking in with the native environment. All of them fall short. Either you’re just wrapping a web app in a web view, or they try to mimick HTML & CSS which is hard to build apps with. With the latter, you’re also interfacing directly with native objects all the time, which is doomed to fail performance-wise. React Native actually performs the layout on a separate thread, so the main thread is as free as it can possibly be to focus on smooth animations (it also provides flexbox for layout).

Read more from the source: jlongster.com

Hacker Way: Rethinking Web App Development at Facebook

Learn the origins of ReactJS, why it is conceptually superior to MVC or MVVM, and the benefits in real-life Facebook apps

 

Delivering reliable, high-performance web experiences at Facebook’s scale has required us to challenge some long-held assumptions about software development. Join us to learn how we abandoned the traditional MVC paradigm in favor of a more functional application architecture.

Read more from the source: YouTube