Tag Archives: Telecommuting

The Difference Between “Remote” and “Remote-First” – ThinkGrowth.org

From Litmus: the 10 things remote teams need to succeed

 

One misconception about remote work is that it hinders collaboration. In my experience, the inverse is more likely: offices hinder independent work. Collaboration tends to happen in short bursts, followed by longer periods of writing, designing, coding and thinking. It’s more important to give employees quiet time than it is to cram them into an open office.

Read more from the source: ThinkGrowth.org

Remote-First vs. Remote-Friendly

Remote-first work environments take some work but can be very appealing

 

I think there’s a split between being remote-friendly — hiring some workers in a different city — and remote-first, meaning you build your development team around a workflow that embraces the concepts of remote work, whether or not your employees are remote.

By forcing yourself to use chat instead of meetings, by forcing yourself to use chatops to mercilessly automate every single manual action, you end up creating things faster, with more built-in context, and greater ability to share your knowledge across the organization.

If you’re not working in a remote-first environment today, not only are you not going to have a remote-friendly environment tomorrow, but you’re going to eventually have a hard time retaining talent and keeping competitive pace in the future.

The world of work is changing. That’s just the way it is.

Read more from the source: zachholman.com

10 Stats That’ll Change the Way You Think About Remote Work – Jell Blog

Contrary to Yahoo’s recent move to ban remote work, research shows companies who commit to telecommuting foster happier employees and more efficient teams

 

We’re still not sure why Yahoo’s CEO recently decided to ban the practice, but we can tell you this:

Companies committed to remote work share two common traits:

  1. Happy employees
  2. Efficient teams

Those aren’t claims based on anecdotal evidence. Numerous scientifically-rigorous, survey-backed empirical findings show how companies offering the flexibility to work from home (or coffee shops or co-working spaces) tend to be more profitable and productive than businesses that support on-site work only.

Read at Jell Blog