Tag Archives: UX

I Got Rejected by Apple Music… So I Redesigned It

A deep and insightful dive into the design of a complex app like Apple Music

 

Jason Yuan writes:

Earlier this year I applied and interviewed for a graphic design internship at Apple Music (an opportunity of a lifetime), and was turned down with a very kind letter stating that although they liked my work, they wanted to see more growth and training.

At first, I was frustrated — Northwestern University doesn’t offer any sort of undergraduate graphic design program, so whatever growth they were looking for would have to be self taught…

…but as soon as I came to this realization, I became inspired to embark on what became a a three-month long journey to the holy grail — the iOS app that Apple Music deserves.

Read more from the source: Medium

Disneyland UX IRL: 3 Insights

We sometimes catch ourselves applying UX in real life; don’t forget there’s a lot we can learn about web UX from real life

 

This “I’m doing it all the time” idea is how I feel about user experience (UX). I am literally moving through every moment looking at the user experience of every situation. Here are some examples from just this week:

Read the blog post at Sawaya Consulting, Inc.

Integrating feature requests without destroying your product

Look at feature requests as a request for a new or improved workflow, not a new feature

 

1. Listen to client feedback with an interpretive ear, and don’t be afraid to dig deeper to identify underlying problems

2. Sometimes feature requests are actually usability issues in disguise

3. Sometimes the product features clients request are actually new product offerings in disguise

4. Focus your energy on hearing the users’ needs, not the users’ wants

5. More features do not equal a better product

Read more from the source: InVision Blog

The Hamburger Menu Doesn’t Work

With engagement down and confusion up, Facebook and others stop using hamburger menus

 

James Archer writes:

The hamburger menu is one of the more embarrassing design conventions of recent years, and it’s time to stop thinking of it as a default, unquestioned solution for mobile navigation.

Our team fell for it, too. We had reservations, of course, and talked through possible alternatives, but for about a year and a half it was the established industry convention for dealing with mobile navigation. Our clients were asking for it, everyone was talking about how great it was, and there wasn’t yet enough data to have clear answers one way or another. We launched a lot of sites that use hamburger menus. We did the best we could with what our industry knew at time.

However, the data’s in now. The hamburger menu doesn’t work well, and it’s time for everyone to move on. At this point, there aren’t many good excuses for using them in new site designs, and it very well may be worth revisiting older sites to see if they might perform better with an updated navigation structure.

Read more from the source: Deep Design

The technology behind preview photos

Facebook Developers explain how they include ~200 byte preview JPEG images in user profile JSON payload to speed up load times

 

Facebook profiles can be slow to download and display. This is especially true on low-connectivity or mobile networks, which often leave you staring at an empty gray box as you wait for images to download. This is a problem in developing markets such as India, where many people new to Facebook are primarily using 2G networks. Our engineering team took this on as a challenge: What could we design and build that would leave a much better first impression?

How a change in preview photos helped speed up profile and page loads by 30 percent.

Read more from the source: Facebook Code

UX is UI — Medium

User experience begins with strategy and requires layers of feature scope, site structure, site skeleton, and “surface” or the graphic interface

 

In a post adapted from a short talk Mike Atherton gave at the SODA Social meetup in London on May 14th, 2015 he writes:

In UX there’s no ‘one-size-fits-all’ design pattern for a given situation. Despite what clients ask, there’s no more a ‘best practice from a UX perspective’ than there is a ‘best recipe from a cookery perspective’.

“Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I’ll spend the first four sharpening the axe.” – Abraham Lincoln

It’s about research, understanding, and evaluation. Figuring out the right problem to solve, before dipping into our toolbag of methods and patterns to solve it.

Read the post at Medium