Tag Archives: UI

Coding Horror: The God Login

A must read: Jeff Atwood researches and explains how to make your sign in and register process a smooth user experience

 

Jeff Atwood of Coding Horror writes:

And one of the coolest things my college professor Mr. Pausch ever taught me was to ask this question:

What’s the God algorithm for this?

Well, when sorting a list, obviously God wouldn’t bother with a stupid Bubble Sort or Quick Sort or Shell Sort like us mere mortals, God would just immediately place the items in the correct order. Bam. One step. The ultimate lower bound on computation, O(1). Not just fixed time, either, but literally one instantaneous step, because you’re freakin’ God.

This kind of blew my mind at the time.

So when we set out to build a login dialog for Discourse, I went back to what I learned in my Algorithms class and asked myself:

How would God build this login dialog?

Read more from the source: blog.codinghorror.com

New study shows that a hamburger menu icon has no different user behavior than the text “menu”

Don’t be afraid to use the hamburger menu icon. Here is more proof that it is universally understood these days

 

Would you like fries with that?

The Hamburger Icon – it’s everywhere. All around you. In web apps, mobile sites, desktop sites, and computer software. The ubiquitous three-line icon is now so common it feels as if it is universally understood to mean “Navigation Menu.” But is it?

Read about the study at booking.com

Where and when did the [x] first enter into the UI lexicon?

Why do we use an “X” symbol to close or exit? Lauren Archer takes us down memory lane and traces the history of [x] to Close

 

X’s are everywhere in user interface (UI) design. A powerful symbol, [x] is capable of closing windows and popups, toolbars and tabs and anything else that might otherwise be cluttering up your screen.

Clicking on [x] to close a feature has become an instinctual part of using a computer and a standard in web and software design. Although it may seem like the ubiquitous [x] has always been a part of Graphical User Interfaces (GUI), a quick jaunt through the history of GUIs reveals that this actually isn’t the case.

Read more from the source: Medium